Aga Khan Museum Does Commendable work on ongoing Kaali University

Wed Jul 06 2022 15:42:57 GMT+0530 (IST)

People in India who are not aware of Toronto Metropolitan University's 'Under The Tent' event had learnt about it in an unusual manner due to a burning controversy. In social media and in mainstream media, a section of people have breathed fire on filmmaker Leena Manimekalai.



Earlier this week, we saw a big controversy after a poster featuring Goddess Kali in an objectionable manner created a big uproar. A few FIRs were also filed against the director and the demand to stop the screening of the documentary also started getting support from various corners. It is alleged that the director also received threats due to the objectionable poster.

Now a big development took place and it hints that the issue might get sorted. In the wake of big discussion on alleged Hinduphobic content, the Aga Khan Museum which planned the event issued an apology saying that they got to know about the issue and they didn't intend to hurt the sentiments of any community.

While announcing that the controversial documentary Kaali will not be screened in the event, the organisers said that they regret hurting the sentiments of the Hindu community. Besides this, the organisers also issued an apology.

The Aga Khan Museum and the event organizers acted in a sensible manner and put an end to the issue without stretching it further. As the documentary was removed from the list, we can expect that the issue might get sorted out.

Back in India, a few FIRs were also filed against the director and the issue took a political turn as an MP from the ruling TMC in West Bengal kickstarted a controversy by saying that she sees Goddess Kali as a meat-eating Goddess. However, the party said it has nothing to do with what the MP said on the ongoing controversy.

"We regret that certain content in our Under the Tent presentation on Saturday, 2 July has caused offense and we are taking steps to address this.We recognise the short film has caused sensitivities and have no further plans to screen it at this time,” the Toronto Metropolitan University said in a release.